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How can pool owners reduce risk?

| Mar 17, 2020 | Injuries |

With summer right around the corner, owners of swimming pools will be opening them up for the season. While a home pool is a great feature to have, it also entails quite a few risks. That is why it is crucial that swimming pool owners take the proper safety steps, to protect themselves as well as others from common risks. 

Limit access to your pool 

Swimming pools are what is known as an attractive nuisance. Even if a person is trespassing and injured at your pool, you could still be held responsible for what occurred if you failed to enact the proper security measures. All pools should be surrounded by a fence with a locking gate, which will deter trespassers. You should also have the pool covered when it is not in use. Some pool owners even elect to install security alarms and lighting, which serve as an even greater deterrent to unwanted guests. 

Know how to perform CPR 

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a literal life-saver if there is a drowning incident at a home pool. Pool owners and any family members living in a household with a pool on a property should all be well-versed in how to provide CPR, as well as knowing other first-aid practices. CPR can buy precious time while emergency personnel are on their way. 

Make sure kids are supervised 

There should always be at least one adult, who is confident in his or her swimming ability, present at home pools when children are swimming. The person tasked with supervising kids should focus all attention on the pool, as texting or talking with another person, which will prove distracting. It is best to designate a specific person for this duty to prevent confusion about who is supposed to be supervising swim sessions.